End-of-life care has boomed in California. So has fraud targeting older Americans

This article is related to SB 664, Supported by CANHR. Ellie Craig Goldstein holds a pouch containing sentimental items from her brother, Peter Craig. Three years after Peter’s death, his sisters Ellie and Joyce Craig are haunted by the memory of his final hours. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times) By Kim Christensen, Ben Poston, Los Angeles Times, December 9 2020 Martin Huff was 67 when he fell off his bicycle, banged up his knee and spent a couple of hours in a Riverside County emergency room before walking out under his own power.

What you need to know if you or a loved one requires end-of-life care

This article is related to SB 664, Supported by CANHR. By Ben Poston, Kim Christensen, Los Angeles Times, December 9 2020 An office building on Victory Boulevard in the San Fernando Valley is home to several hospice providers.(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times) Conceived as an end-of-life option for terminally ill patients, hospices provide palliative care, medications, nursing services and counseling for those diagnosed with six months or less to live.

Dying Californians suffer harm and neglect from an industry meant to comfort them

This article is related to SB 664, Supported by CANHR. By Kim Christensen and Ben Poston, Los Angeles Times, March 9 2021 A well-worn office building on Victory Boulevard in Van Nuys is home to more than a dozen hospice providers. Los Angeles County hospices have multiplied sixfold in the last decade and now account for more than half of the state’s roughly 1,200 Medicare-certified providers.