New reform measures target fraud, kickbacks in California’s end-of-life care industry

This article is related to SB 664, Supported by CANHR. By Kim Christensen, Los Angeles Times, April 30 2021 A well-worn office building on Victory Boulevard in Van Nuys is home to more than a dozen hospice providers. Los Angeles County hospices have multiplied sixfold in the last decade and now account for more than half of the state’s roughly 1,200 Medicare-certified providers.

Save Our Seniors Urges Department of Health to Reject Sakura ICF ‘Transition Plan’

This article is related to AB 279 (Muratsuchi), sponsored by CANHR. By Rafu Shimpo, Los Angeles Japanese Daily News The following letter was sent on April 5 to Cassie Dunham, acting deputy director of the California Department of Public Health, by Taiji Miyagawa and David Emiliano Zapata Maldonado, Ph.D. on behalf of the Save Our Seniors Network Coordinating Committee.

OPPOSE AB-499

AB 499 seeks to amend California law governing referral agencies for assisted living facilities (known in California as Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly or RCFEs) to provide accountability, but instead creates unnecessary communication and compliance barriers. Specifically, while the bill allows referral agencies to provide information to seniors about its services and fees verbally, it requires seniors to submit a written request if they want to receive such information in writing.

Support AB-636

Currently, the Elder Abuse and Dependent Adult Civil Protection Act (EADACPA) establishes procedures and requirements for reporting instances of known or suspected abuses or neglect of a California elder or dependent adult. Information relevant to the incident is to be given to specified investigators, including investigators from an adult protective services agency, a local law enforcement agency, and the probate court.